Kirk Douglas ‘left entire $60million fortune to charity’ | Daily Mail Online

Actor Kirk Douglas has reportedly left his entire $60million fortune to charity. 

Kirk was laid to rest on February 7 at the Westwood Memorial in Los Angeles, two days after he died at his home. He was 103.

According to the Mirror, Kirk didn’t leave any money to his son, Michael, a Hollywood star who has his own net worth of about $300million.

But Kirk, who was known for his charitable contributions throughout his life, did leave the money to several beneficiaries. 

A total of $50million will be distributed through the Douglas Foundation, which was founded by Kirk and his wife, Anne. 

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Actor Kirk Douglas has reportedly left his entire $60million fortune to charity. He didn’t leave any money to his son, Michael (left with his father in 2012), a Hollywood star who has his own net worth of about $300million

But Kirk, who was known for his charitable contributions throughout his life, did leave the money to several beneficiaries, including to the Kirk Douglas Theatre (pictured)

Some of Kirk’s millions was left to the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (pictured)

A third beneficiary was the Sinai Temple of Los Angeles, which houses the Kirk and Anne Douglas Childhood Center

Another beneficiary was St Lawrence University (pictured), where Kirk and Anne established a scholarship for minority and underprivileged students

According to the Mirror, some of the beneficiaries include St Lawrence University, the Sinai Temple of Los Angeles, the Kirk Douglas Theatre and the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

Prior to his passing Kirk and Anne were already in the process of making more generous donations. 

Meanwhile, Michael has been campaigning for Michael Bloomberg. 

The actor addressed an audience while speaking in support of the Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City mayor at a Bloomberg campaign office on Sunday in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Kirk is survived by Anne, who is his second wife, and three of his four sons: Michael, Joel, and Peter.  

Michael, 75, responded to his father’s death by posting a series of pictures of the two of them together, including a family portrait with all Kirk’s sons. He called his father ‘a legend’, ‘a humanitarian’ and ‘a wonderful husband’.   

‘It is with tremendous sadness that my brothers and I announce that Kirk Douglas left us today at the age of 103,’ Michael wrote at the time.  

Meanwhile, Michael (pictured Sunday) has been campaigning for Michael Bloomberg

The actor addressed an audience while speaking in support of the Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City mayor at a Bloomberg campaign office on Sunday in Quincy, Massachusetts

‘To the world he was a legend, an actor from the golden age of movies who lived well into his golden years, a humanitarian whose commitment to justice and the causes he believed in set a standard for all of us to aspire to.

‘But to me and my brothers Joel and Peter he was simply Dad, to Catherine, a wonderful father-in-law, to his grandchildren and great grandchild their loving grandfather, and to his wife Anne, a wonderful husband.

‘Kirk’s life was well lived,’ Douglas added, ‘and he leaves a legacy in film that will endure for generations to come, and a history as a renowned philanthropist who worked to aid the public and bring peace to the planet’.

‘Let me end with the words I told him on his last birthday and which will always remain true. Dad- I love you so much and I am so proud to be your son,’ Michael said. 

Kirk and Anne married in 1954. Kirk had two sons with Anne, Eric and Peter Douglas. 

Their youngest son Eric tragically died of an accidental drug overdose in 2004 aged 46. 

Kirk is survived by his second wife Anne (together, in 2013) and three of his four sons: Michael, Joel, and Peter. Together, Kirk and Anne founded the Douglas Foundation 

Michael (left), 75, responded to his father’s death by posting a series of pictures of the two of them together. He called his father ‘a legend’, ‘a humanitarian’ and ‘a wonderful husband’ 

Michael Douglas and his brother Joel were the sons of Kirk and his first wife Diana Douglas, who died in 2015 aged 92.  

German-born Anne, 100, met Kirk in Paris when she was the publicity girl on his 1953 film Act Of Love. 

Anne initially turned down the job as Kirk had built up a reputation as a Lothario but eventually agreed to work with him as long as it was strictly business.

At the time, Kirk was engaged to actress Pier Angeli but says he ‘fell out of love with her’. 

He married Anne in Las Vegas on May 29, 1954. Kirk admitted to extramarital affairs in their 65 years as a married couple. 

Anne knew about the affairs and wrote: ‘One of the things I love most about Kirk is his inability to keep secrets… Let me explain my attitude concerning this. As a European, I understood it was unrealistic to expect total fidelity in a marriage.’ 

Douglas suffered a stroke back in 1996 that left him with slurred speech and damaged facial nerves but it didn’t stop him from attending the Academy Awards ceremony two weeks later to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award.

He had been in relatively good health since his stroke.

Michael’s wife, Catherine Zeta-Jones, 50, was among those leading the tributes in the wake of her father-in-law’s death, writing alongside a photo of the pair: ‘To my darling Kirk, I shall love you for the rest of my life. I miss you already. Sleep tight…’

A host of other Hollywood stars joined in the outpouring of grief, with celebrities and fans alike flooding social media to honor the legendary screen star after news of his death broke.  

Kirk Douglas and Anne Buydens (pictured together in 1954) were married for 65 years despite Douglas’ extramarital affairs

Kirk and Anne are pictured in 1963 with their son Peter – the couple had a second son Eric who died in 2004

Kirk is seen in a promotional still from the 1960 Stanley Kubrick film Spartacus

Sylvester Stallone, who shared a poster from Douglas’s 1949 boxing film Champion, wrote on Instagram: ‘KIRK DOUGLAS!!! The last great giant of my cinema heroes has passed on to Infinite glory. Amazing artist! The likes of which we will never ever see again!’

Steven Spielberg presented Douglas with an honorary Oscar at the Academy Awards in 1996 and was also one of those who gave remarks at the star’s 100th birthday party in December 2016.

‘Kirk retained his movie star charisma right to the end of his wonderful life and I’m honored to have been a small part of his last 45 years,’ Spielberg said. 

‘I will miss his handwritten notes, letters and fatherly advice, and his wisdom and courage – even beyond such a breathtaking body of work – are enough to inspire me for the rest of mine.’ 

Douglas was the son of Jewish Russian immigrants who rose through the ranks to become one of Hollywood’s biggest-ever stars.

Flowers adorned Kirk’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame following his death on February 5

The famed actor and producer, who was one of the last of Hollywood’s Golden Age, made more than 90 movies in a career that stretched across seven decades.

He was renowned for the macho tough guy roles he took on.

Films such as Spartacus and The Vikings made him one of the biggest box-office stars of the 1950s and 60s.

Douglas received critical acclaim for his role in the 1960 classic Spartacus where he played the gladiator leader of a Roman slave revolt. 

He was nominated three times for the best actor Oscar in 1949 for Champion, The Bad and the Beautiful in 1953 and Lust for Life in 1957.

Douglas never received an Academy Award for an individual film but the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded him an honorary Oscar in 1996 for his role as a creative and moral force in the movie industry.  

This content was originally published here.

Kirk Douglas, Iconic Jewish Movie Star, Dies at 103

Kirk Douglas in 1950. PhotoQuest/Getty Images.

LOS ANGELES (JTA) – Kirk Douglas, the legendary actor who portrayed legions of tough guys and embraced his Jewish heritage later in life, died at his home in Beverly Hills on Wednesday. He was 103.

Over a career that spanned 87 films — including 73 big screen features and 14 on television — the blond, blue-eyed Douglas, dimpled chin thrust forward, was often cast as the toughest guy around, vanquishing hordes of Romans, Vikings and assorted bad guys.

Thrice nominated for an Academy Award and a recipient of an Oscar for lifetime achievement and a Presidential Medal of Freedom, Douglas evolved from an egocentric and promiscuous young man into a multi-talented actor, director, author, philanthropist and student of Torah who left a deep imprint on both Hollywood and the Jewish people.

Douglas also was the author of 11 books, ranging from personal memoirs and a Holocaust-themed novel for young readers to a collection of poetry dedicated to his wife.

“Most stars of his stature are shaped out of mythic clay,” the director Steven Spielberg said in presenting Douglas with the lifetime achievement Oscar in 1996. “Kirk Douglas never chose that. He doesn’t have a single character that makes him unique. Instead he has a singular honesty, a drive to be inimitable.”

Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch in 1916 in the upstate New York town of Amsterdam, the son of an illiterate Russian-Jewish immigrant who supported his six daughters and one son as a rag picker and junk man.

A chance to escape came shortly after his bar mitzvah, when the Sons of Israel Synagogue offered to underwrite his rabbinical studies. Douglas firmly declined, declaring that he would become an actor. He held fast to that ambition while attending Saint Lawrence University on a wrestling scholarship and during World War II service in the U.S. Navy.

His first movie role came in 1946, when he played Barbara Stanwyck’s husband in “The Strange Love of Martha Ivers.” Douglas received favorable reviews, but his career wouldn’t really take off until three years (and six films) later, when he portrayed Midge Kelly, a ferocious and amoral boxer in “Champion.” The performance earned him an Academy Award nomination for best actor.

During the 1950s and ’60s, Douglas ranked consistently as one of Hollywood’s top male stars for his single-minded focus on his craft, while also squeezing in Broadway and television appearances. He was also known for egocentricity in a town with no shortage of oversize egos and for bedding an endless string of women, from movie queens to casual pickups.

In the 1950s, he starred in 23 movies. He earned best actor Oscar nominations for “The Bad and the Beautiful” and “Lust for Life.” And in 1953, he starred as a Holocaust survivor in “The Juggler,” the first Hollywood feature to be filmed in Israel.

He opened the decade of the 1960s with “Spartacus,” perhaps his most enduring movie, in which he played the leader of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. The film won four Oscars, though none for Douglas.

But Douglas did distinguish himself for insisting that writer Dalton Trumbo, who had been blacklisted as a communist for a decade but continued to write under a pseudonym, be credited onscreen despite dire warnings that such a provocation would end his own Hollywood career. Douglas was honored for that stance in 2011 by the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival.

With increasing fame and fortune, Douglas showed little interest in Jewish practice, though there were exceptions.

“I always fasted on Yom Kippur,” he told a reporter. “I still worked on the movie set, but I fasted. And let me tell you, it’s not easy making love to Lana Turner on an empty stomach.”

In his later years, Douglas would come to embrace his Jewishness, a shift he dates to a near-fatal collision in 1991 between his helicopter and a stunt plane in which two younger men died. The crash compressed his spine by three inches. While lying in a hospital bed with excruciating back pain, he started pondering the meaning of his life.

“I came to believe that I was spared because I had never come to grips with what it means to be Jewish,” he said.

Douglas embarked on an intensive regime of Torah study with a number of young rabbis and celebrated a second bar mitzvah at age 83, telling the Hollywood luminaries crammed into the 200-seat chapel at Sinai Temple for the occasion: “Today, I am a man.”

Neither of his two wives — the late actress Diana Dill and Anne Buydens, whom he married in 1954 — were Jewish, and none of his children were raised in the faith. But his oldest son, the actor-director Michael Douglas, has reconnected with Judaism and won the 2015 Genesis Prize, a $1 million award recognizing Jews of great accomplishment who exhibit Jewish values.

In 2014, at Douglas’ 50th wedding anniversary, Buydens startled the guests by announcing that she had converted to Judaism.

“Kirk has been married to two shiksas and it’s about time he married a nice Jewish girl,” she proclaimed.

In 1996, Douglas suffered a stroke that left him speechless. He fell into a deep depression that nearly led him to take his own life.

A few months later, he made his first public appearance to accept the lifetime achievement award.

“Whether he’s dealing with a character on screen or with the all-too-real effect of a recent stroke, courage remains Kirk Douglas’ personal and professional hallmark,” Spielberg said in presenting the award.

Through rigorous speech therapy, Douglas taught himself to speak again – slowly, with a slight slur. He later published a book about the experience titled “My Stroke of Luck.”

Among his other books are “Let’s Face It,” which proclaimed that romance begins at 80; “I Am Spartacus!,” focusing on making the film and breaking the blacklist; and “Climbing the Mountain,” which traced his search for spirituality and Jewish identity.

In 2014, at 98, he published his first book of poetry, “Life Could Be Verse,” in which he expressed his enduring love for his wife as well as his heartbreak at the death of his youngest son, Eric, who died of a self-induced drug overdose.

Along with his wife, Douglas has given over $100 million to charitable causes in the United States and Israel. The couple have established nearly 400 playgrounds in poorer sections of Los Angeles and Jerusalem, an Alzheimer’s hospital unit, and a theater facing the Western Wall featuring films on the history of Judaism and Jerusalem.

In 1981, Douglas received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America’s highest civilian award, from President Jimmy Carter.

Along with his wife and son Michael, Douglas is survived by sons Peter and Joel Douglas, seven grandchildren – Cameron, Dylan, Carys Zeta, Kelsey, Jason, Tyler and Ryan – and a sister, Ida Sahr of Schenectady, New York.

The post Kirk Douglas, Iconic Jewish Movie Star, Dies at 103 appeared first on Hadassah Magazine.

This content was originally published here.

Kirk Douglas, an iconic star who reconnected to Judaism after near-fatal crash | The Times of Israel

LOS ANGELES (JTA) – Kirk Douglas, the legendary actor who portrayed legions of tough guys and embraced his Jewish heritage later in life, died at his home in Beverly Hills on Wednesday. He was 103.

Over a career that spanned 87 films — 73 big screen features and 14 on television — the blond, blue-eyed Douglas, dimpled chin thrust forward, was often cast as the toughest guy around, vanquishing hordes of Romans, Vikings and assorted bad guys.

Thrice nominated for an Academy Award and a recipient of an Oscar for lifetime achievement and a Presidential Medal of Freedom, Douglas evolved from an egocentric and promiscuous young man into a multi-talented actor, director, author, philanthropist and student of Torah who left a deep imprint on both Hollywood and the Jewish people.

Douglas also was the author of 11 books, ranging from personal memoirs and a Holocaust-themed novel for young readers to a collection of poetry dedicated to his wife.

Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch in 1916 in the upstate New York town of Amsterdam, the son of an illiterate Russian-Jewish immigrant who supported his six daughters and one son as a rag picker and junk man.

A chance to escape came shortly after his bar mitzvah, when the Sons of Israel Synagogue offered to underwrite his rabbinical studies. Douglas firmly declined, declaring that he would become an actor. He held fast to that ambition while attending Saint Lawrence University on a wrestling scholarship and during World War II service in the US Navy.

Portrait of American actor Kirk Douglas as he poses with his hands in his pockets, 1950. (Photo by PhotoQuest/Getty Images via JTA)

His first movie role came in 1946, when he played Barbara Stanwyck’s husband in “The Strange Love of Martha Ivers.” Douglas received favorable reviews, but his career wouldn’t really take off until three years (and six films) later, when he portrayed Midge Kelly, a ferocious and amoral boxer in “Champion.” The performance earned him an Academy Award nomination for best actor.

With increasing fame and fortune, Douglas showed little interest in Jewish practice, though there were exceptions.

“I always fasted on Yom Kippur,” he told a reporter. “I still worked on the movie set, but I fasted. And let me tell you, it’s not easy making love to Lana Turner on an empty stomach.”

In his later years, Douglas would come to embrace his Jewishness, a shift he dates to a near-fatal collision in 1991 between his helicopter and a stunt plane in which two younger men died. The crash compressed his spine by three inches. While lying in a hospital bed with excruciating back pain, he started pondering the meaning of his life.

“I came to believe that I was spared because I had never come to grips with what it means to be Jewish,” he said.

Douglas embarked on an intensive regime of Torah study with a number of young rabbis and celebrated a second bar mitzvah at age 83, telling the Hollywood luminaries crammed into the 200-seat chapel at Sinai Temple for the occasion: “Today, I am a man.”

Neither of his two wives — the late actress Diana Dill and Anne Buydens, whom he married in 1954 — were Jewish, and none of his children were raised in the faith. But his oldest son, the actor-director Michael Douglas, has reconnected with Judaism and won the 2015 Genesis Prize, a $1 million award recognizing Jews of great accomplishment who exhibit Jewish values.

In 2014, at Douglas’ 50th wedding anniversary, Buydens startled the guests by announcing that she had converted to Judaism.

“Kirk has been married to two shiksas and it’s about time he married a nice Jewish girl,” she proclaimed.

Kirk Douglas as Spartacus in Stanley Kubrick’s film of the same name. (Screen capture)

During the 1950s and ’60s, Douglas ranked consistently as one of Hollywood’s top male stars for his single-minded focus on his craft, while also squeezing in Broadway and television appearances. He was also known for egocentricity in a town with no shortage of oversize egos and for bedding an endless string of women, from movie queens to casual pickups.

In the 1950s, he starred in 23 movies. He earned best actor Oscar nominations for “The Bad and the Beautiful” and “Lust for Life.” And in 1953, he starred as a Holocaust survivor in “The Juggler,” the first Hollywood feature to be filmed in Israel.

He opened the decade of the 1960s with “Spartacus,” perhaps his most enduring movie, in which he played the leader of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. The film won four Oscars, though none for Douglas.

But Douglas did distinguish himself for insisting that writer Dalton Trumbo, who had been blacklisted as a communist for a decade but continued to write under a pseudonym, be credited onscreen despite dire warnings that such a provocation would end his own Hollywood career. Douglas was honored for that stance in 2011 by the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival.

In 1996, Douglas suffered a stroke that left him speechless. He fell into a deep depression that nearly led him to take his own life.

A few months later, he made his first public appearance to accept a lifetime achievement achievement Oscar.

“Most stars of his stature are shaped out of mythic clay,” the director Steven Spielberg said in presenting Douglas with award. “Kirk Douglas never chose that. He doesn’t have a single character that makes him unique. Instead he has a singular honesty, a drive to be inimitable.”

“Whether he’s dealing with a character on screen or with the all-too-real effect of a recent stroke, courage remains Kirk Douglas’ personal and professional hallmark,” Spielberg said.

Through rigorous speech therapy, Douglas taught himself to speak again – slowly, with a slight slur. He later published a book about the experience titled “My Stroke of Luck.”

A Palestinian boy looks as Hollywood legend Kirk Douglas plays at a playground in the Arab quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem, July 17, 2000. (Eyal Warshavsky/AP)

Among his other books are “Let’s Face It,” which proclaimed that romance begins at 80; “I Am Spartacus!,” focusing on making the film and breaking the blacklist; and “Climbing the Mountain,” which traced his search for spirituality and Jewish identity.

In 2014, at 98, he published his first book of poetry, “Life Could Be Verse,” in which he expressed his enduring love for his wife as well as his heartbreak at the death of his youngest son, Eric, who died of a self-induced drug overdose.

Along with his wife, Douglas has given over $100 million to charitable causes in the United States and Israel. The couple have established nearly 400 playgrounds in poorer sections of Los Angeles and Jerusalem, an Alzheimer’s hospital unit, and a theater facing the Western Wall featuring films on the history of Judaism and Jerusalem.

In 1981, Douglas received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America’s highest civilian award, from President Jimmy Carter.

Along with his wife and son Michael, Douglas is survived by sons Peter and Joel Douglas, seven grandchildren – Cameron, Dylan, Carys Zeta, Kelsey, Jason, Tyler and Ryan – and a sister, Ida Sahr of Schenectady, New York.

This content was originally published here.

Kirk Douglas: Hollywood legend dies aged 103 – The Scotsman

American actor Kirk Douglas has died aged 103, his son Michael said in a statement.

Douglas, best known for films including Spartacus and Ace In The Hole, was one of the last remaining stars of Hollywood’s golden age.

American actor Kirk Douglas has died aged 103.

He died on Wednesday, according to his son Michael, also a Hollywood actor.

“It is with tremendous sadness that my brothers and I announce that Kirk Douglas left us today at the age of 103,” Michael’s statement said.

“To the world he was a legend, an actor from the golden age of movies who lived well into his golden years, a humanitarian whose commitment to justice and the causes he believed in set a standard for all of us to aspire to.”

Michael, married to Welsh actress Catherine Zeta Jones, said his father was a “wonderful husband” and a “loving grandfather”.

Kirk Douglas has died aged 103. Picture: Getty

He added: “Kirk’s life was well lived, and he leaves a legacy in film that will endure for generations to come, and a history as a renowned philanthropist who worked to aid the public and bring peace to the planet.

“Let me end with the words I told him on his last birthday and which will always remain true. Dad- I love you so much and I am so proud to be your son.”

Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch in Amsterdam, New York, in 1916 to mother Bryna and Herschel Danielovitch, Jewish immigrants from what is today Belarus.

He endured an impoverished childhood and legally changed his name to Kirk Douglas before joining the US Navy during World War II.

He made his film debut in 1946 noir The Strange Love Of Martha Ivers, opposite Barbara Stanwyck.

Douglas, with his explosive acting style and masculine persona, soon established himself as a Hollywood leading man and throughout the 1950s starred in serious dramas, westerns and war movies.

His first best actor Oscar nomination came for his role in 1949 boxing drama Champion, while his second was in recognition of his part in 1952’s The Bad And The Beautiful, in which he starred opposite Lana Turner.

His third followed for the 1956 biopic Lust For Life, in which he portrayed Vincent Van Gogh.

But it is for 1960 historical epic Spartacus for which Douglas is best known.

He partnered with the then relatively unknown director Stanley Kubrick to play the leader of a slave revolt in ancient Rome.

Spartacus features one of the most quoted scenes in cinema. Towards the end of the film the captured slaves are told to identify Spartacus in exchange for leniency – they respond by all claiming to be Spartacus, sealing their own fate.

It is a scene that has been endlessly imitated and parodied, most notably by Monty Python’s Life of Brian in 1979.

Spartacus also marked Douglas’s rebellion against the Hollywood blacklist during the early Cold War era.

When the film was released, he gave full credit to the screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, effectively ending the blacklist and becoming a hero those ostracised by it.

Reflecting on it years later, Douglas said: “I’ve made over 85 pictures, but the thing I’m most proud of is breaking the blacklist.”

The Douglas family is a Hollywood dynasty. Michael, 75, is a two-time Oscar winner known for films including Wall Street, Basic Instinct and Fatal Attraction.

During Michael’s Hollywood Walk Of Fame ceremony in November 2018, a proud Douglas watched on from his wheelchair.

The father and son shared a poignant moment and a kiss shortly after Michael’s star was unveiled.

During the ceremony, Michael turned to his father and said: “I know, no son of yours is celebrating his 50th anniversary in the business, it means so much to me Dad that you’re here today.

“I thank you for your advice, your inspiration and I’ll say it simply with all my heart, I’m so proud to be your son.”

Douglas was awarded an honorary Oscar in 1996 while the American Film Institute placed him number 17 on their list of the greatest male screen legends of classic Hollywood cinema.

He narrowly survived a helicopter crash in 1991 and suffered a stroke in 1996, following which he lived with a renewed focused on spirituality and religion.

Douglas, a father of four, is survived by his second wife, Anne Buydens, who he married in 1954.

This content was originally published here.